True or false?

Test your knowledge in the quiz about media freedom.

35 journalists were killed in the world in 2016, and 150 were in prison.

False. In 2016, 49 journalists were killed and 199 were in prison.

Global press freedom declined to its lowest point in 12 years in 2015.

True. In many countries around the world, political, criminal, and terrorist forces have increasingly tried to take control over or silence the media. Many journalists have been threatened and/or violently attacked. In 2015, these problems were most acute in the Middle East.

Two-thirds of all internet users – 67% – live in countries where criticism of the government, military, or ruling family are subject to censorship.

False. Three-thirds of all internet users – 67% – live in countries where criticism of the government, military, or ruling family are censorship.


Globally, 27% of all Internet users live in countries where people have been arrested for publishing, sharing, or merely “liking” content on Facebook.


True. Nearly 3 out of 10 internet users run the risk of being imprisoned, sometimes fined or even flogged, because of what they do on line.

The new Tunisian constitution from 2014 guarantees freedom of expression at all times and in all situations for its citizens.

False. The constitution does guarantee freedom of expression, but also lists circumstances in which restrictions on press freedom would be justified, including, for example, to protect “public morals.”

Tunisian freelance journalists like bloggers and youtubers have to obtain an official press card if they, for example, want to enter the parliament building without a special invitation.

False. Tunisian freelance journalists are not allowed to obtain an official press card. This is only given to employed journalists, which also means that the freelancers lack some of the legal protections that are given to those employed by Tunisian media.

All journalists in Tunisia can demand access to documents and information from the state without special permission.


False. Only journalists who hold academic degrees can demand access to documents and information from the state without prior permission from the Interior Ministry.

The media in Tunisia are on the whole free to cover all political parties and leaders without any government interference.

True. The Tunisian press code from 2011 clearly states that the press should be completely free in covering all sides of politics.

Prior to the revolution, the media landscape in Tunisia was dominated by a handful of state-owned outlets and private firms owned by figures tied to the family of former leader Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali and the ruling party.


True. Since 2011, state-owned media have been restructured to include more diverse viewpoints, and many private, independent media outlets have opened to produce print, television, and radio.